Tag Archives: Strathconon

Another Old Route through Ross-shire – Achanalt Station to Dalnachroich in Strathconon via Badinluchie

by Meryl Marshall (NOSAS)

What is believed to be an old droving route from Badinluchie, south of Loch Achanalt in Strath Bran, to Dalnachroich in Strathconon was followed by several NOSAS members on a sunny day in October.

Climbing up from Badinluchie

Climbing up from Badinluchie

The Roy map of c1750 has two roads from the east coast to the west through Ross-shire, one through Strathconon and one through Strath Bran. At this time they would hardly have been roads but more probably bridle ways easily traversed by ponies; a road from Contin to Poolewe through Strath Bran first appears in the records about the year 1760. From the late 1700s, and probably even earlier, communication with the Isle of Lewis passed through the tiny port of Poolewe, cattle were shipped from the Islands to join the droving routes which led eastwards to the tryst at Muir of Ord; John Knox was to report that he sailed from Stornoway to Poolewe in a small unworthy vessel used for the transport of cattle (Tour of the Highlands and Islands 1786).  Cattle export was to reach its height in the early 1800s during the Napoleonic Wars.

The main route by which the drovers headed east for Muir of Ord was via Loch Maree, Achnasheen and Strath Bran, although there were other routes to the north. Maps of the late 18th and early 19th century – John Ainslie 1789, Arrowsmith 1807 and John Thomson 1832, indicate a branch road heading south over the hills from Achanalt in Strath Bran to Strathconon via “Baud Leuchie”; this route would have made eminent sense for drovers wishing to avoid hazardous river crossings on their way to Muir of Ord.

Arrowsmith Map 1807 Part 1

Arrowsmith Map 1807 Part 1

Arrowsmith Map 1807 Part 2

Arrowsmith Map Detail 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Old routes through Ross-shire: Luib, near Achnasheen, to Scardroy in Strathconon

by Meryl Marshall (NOSAS)

A six mile stretch of rough moorland, west of Achnasheen, is traversed by what was once a well made road generally 3 metres in width. Although it has fallen into disuse and is travelled only by the occasional walker, possibly doing a coast to coast trip, the road today is very distinct and forms a pleasant days’ ramble, especially when combined with an outward journey to Achnasheen on the Kyle of Lochalsh train (with homeward transport parked at Scardroy). But what are the origins of the road? and why did it fall out of use?

A route through Strathconon to Loch Carron had been in existence for centuries; it linked the east and west coast lands of the Clan Mackenzie. The Roy map of 1750 has the road passing NW from Scardroy to Luib on Loch Gowan, 3kms west of Achnasheen, and the first mention of an Inn at Luib, or Luibgargan as it is sometimes known, is on the Dorret map of 1750. A 1798 list of householders has John Macdonald, described as “vintner”, residing there and in 1814 Donald Sage passed this way: “Leaving Attadale in the morning I breakfasted at Luibgargan, proceeded on foot down Strathconan and rested during the night at Garve” (Memorabilia Domestica, Donald Sage, 1899 p191). Both the road and the Inn appear on other early maps too, the Ainslie map of 1789, Arrowsmith of 1807 and Thomson of 1830. It also appears on a Strathconon estate map of 1825 where it is annotated “the road from Loch Carron”. So quite clearly this was a route of some importance; how did it come to be abandoned?

Dorret Map

Dorret Map 1750 (detail; click on map for wider view)

Ainslie Map 1789

Ainslie Map 1789 (detail; click on map for wider view)

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